Beacon Field Airport®

THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE for BEACON FIELD AIRPORT®



Elevation 249 feet, Fairfax County, Virginia       GPS 3846'20.40"N :  774'54.07"W
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Beacon Flier Salute !

Mr. Marion C. "Junie" Marshall, Jr.

Our Navy Magazine -- Cover Photo
Mr. Marion "Junie" Marshall worked as an aviation mechanic and metal smith for Paul & Faye Zimmer's aircraft repair shop at Beacon Field.      He was a veteran of  World War II and the Korean War and had both airframe and engine repair certifications.    
In Navy Sailor Uniform 1942
 A native of St. Michaels, Maryland,  Mr. Marshall enlisted in the US Navy on his seventeenth birthday in 1942 and received aviation metal smith training in Norfolk.    He had a brief tour in California before being shipped overseas.  This tour was especially interesting when Mr. Marshall and a few shipmates were sent over to 20th Century Fox Studios to serve as extras in the 1942 film Wing and a Prayer starring Dana Andrews and  Don Ameche.     

Mr. Marshall subsequently served in the Pacific theater for the remainder of his tour.  Discharged in 1946, he returned stateside and worked briefly for a small company, rebuilding and refitting wrecked airplanes. He then worked as a waterman tonging oysters and catching crabs and later as a carpenter.   

When the Korean conflict began in 1950,   he immediately reenlisted in the Navy hoping to be stationed stateside training the new troops.    Thirty days after reenlistment, he was drawing sea pay !

During the Korean War,  Mr. Marshall served aboard the Boxer CV-21,  an Essex class aircraft carrier that hangered 82 aircraft.   Despite the sizable crew of 3400 sailors,  Mr. Marshall distinguished himself by being flown behind enemy lines to repair an A-1 Skyraider that had been shot down.   The repair was made and Mr. Marshall flew out in the same A-1 demonstrating to the pilot W.E. Sullivan his trust in metal repairs.   This was a one place aeroplane and Mr. Marshall would have stowed behind the pilot's seat.    Shortly thereafter,  Our Navy Magazine, recognized this heroic feat with a cover photo (first photo above) and news item (right).
Mr. Marshall on the right with his back to the camera --Our Navy Magazine

Following active duty in the Korean conflict,  Mr. Marshall settled into aviation mechnic repair with Capitol Airlines in Washington D.C.

As did many other airline employees, he also worked part time at Beacon on other aviation projects.   Mr. Marshall was noted for his enthusiastic repair work on  the CBY-3 Burnelli Loadmaster that had been brought up from Fort Belvoir on a flat bed trailer.   The transport required that the Virginia State Police  temporarily close the Route 1 corridor in the early morning hours from 2 to 3AM to accommodate the move.  The Burnelli parked in front of Zimmer's hangar while the components were being repaired in the shop.  

 
CBY-3 Burnelli Loadmaster at Beacon Field
Mr. Junie Marshall in the shop working on the Burnelli wings
Junie Marshall's employer at Beacon Field, Mr. Zimmer, fostered a family atmosphere by hosting social get togethers for his employees including fish frys, crab feasts, and games for the kids.   On one occasion, Beacon Flier, Bill Sellers,  flew Junie over to St. Michaels and they returned with two bushels of crabs for a feast.    On another,  Ruby and Bill Brown from Alabama, treated everyone with hushpuppies to the delight of the eastern shoremen.

After Beacon Field closed,  Mr. Marshall returned to the shore and in his spare time restored an old
Chesapeake Bay Log Canoe to sailing condition.   The canoe, named Rover, is now at the Maritime Museum in St. Michaels
.

Working on the Chesapeake Bay Log Canoe
Working on the Chesapeake Bay Log Canoe
The Rover sailing !! Now in the St. Michaels Maritime Museum